Despite a November 2012 announcement from the HSE (Health and Safety Executive) that it’s farm safety days had grown in popularity, there are still too many accidents on Britain’s farms. Agriculture has the worst fatal accident rate of all UK industries, with 15-20% of all workplace fatalities taking place within farming and agriculture. Only 1.5% of the population works in the entire industry, so that’s a pretty sobering statistic.

The Challenges of Agricultural Work

Being run over by a vehicle and falling from height account for just under half of all fatal accidents. The HSE is keen to communicate with farmers and agricultural workers to minimise the risks associated with the job. But for many farmers who work alone, health and safety can seem like an irritation. The HSE wants to help this type of farmer learn more about how easy some health and safety protocols can be to implement.

Despite the danger posed by livestock, only 10% of all fatalities were livestock-related.

In terms of non-fatal accidents, it’s estimated only 25% of all accidents are reported to the HSE, a figure that drops to just 5% where self-employed farmers and agricultural employees working alone for long periods are concerned.

Safety and Health Awareness Days for Farmers (SHAD)

This project was developed to help farmers learn about and comply with health and safety guidelines on a convent all-in-one-day schedule. Part of a new initiative to promote health and safety to farmers and farm workers who often work alone and in dangerous conditions, the HSE announced that the first sessions of the SHAD scheme were booked out well in advance.

Challenges faced by those in Britain’s most dangerous industry are varied and often easily managed with sensible health and safety measure implementation. Organisers hope the SHAD scheme will reduce the risk of fatal injuries and accidents by providing farmers with a free, voluntary learning zone of their peers. The days offered things like livestock handling tips, machine care (e.g. how to safely move portable diesel generators, tractor care, ladder maintenance, etc) and practical demonstrations.

The first five events were held in Illminster, Ludlow, Orkney, Salisbury and Spalding, and were attended by more than 1,700 agricultural workers and farmers. There are a further twenty-two events planned for the  2012/2013 year.

But what does this have to do with our company? Second hand diesel generators are especially popular for tough agricultural work because they’re hardy and resilient in challenging conditions. We enjoy a great relationship with the agricultural sector because our generator services offer low cost solutions and dexterous generator rental and buyer contracts to make sure our customers get the beast deal.

For us, a significant part of that relationship rests on a thorough understanding of the industry and applications of our products within the various sectors, including our Fuel Tank Rental. We take time to help all our agricultural clients to make the best decisions on everything from generator choice to payment method. To help us stay in the loop, we follow HSE regulations with interest.  You might also like to read our blog about the difference between KW and KVA.

Cookie Control

Cookie control

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better.

I'm fine with this

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better.

You can use this tool to change your cookie settings. Otherwise, we’ll assume you’re OK to continue.

Some of the cookies we use are essential for the site to work.

We also use some non-essential cookies to collect information for making reports and to help us improve the site. The cookies collect information in an anonymous form.

To control third party cookies, you can also adjust your browser settings.

I'm fine with this
(One cookie will be set to store your preference)
(Ticking this sets a cookie to hide this popup if you then hit close. This will not store any personal information)
Information and Settings Cookie policy